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ESCOM: “WE RAN OUT OF CASH FOR DIESEL.”

south_africa

SOUTH AFRICA- THAT FAILED LAND OF COMMUNIST ANC DIASPORA & WHITE GENOCIDE.

 

Durban – Eskom is fighting a touch-and-go battle to prevent the catastrophic collapse of the country’s electricity grid.

The energy supplier has implemented stage 3 load shedding, a final measure to avert disaster. For now the parastatal remains in control of the country’s supply, but warned that if the power demand did not drop in coming weeks the system would collapse, resulting in rolling blackouts which would probably bring the country to a standstill. Eskom measures power shortages in terms of stage 1, 2 and 3 – with 3 being the mostsevere. Stage 3 load shedding was put in place over the weekend to allow for a build-up of supply for the week ahead.

The supplier’s electricity-generating infrastructure has been hit hard by a number of issues including depleted water reserves and logistical issues relating to diesel supplies at power stations, and the shutdown of two open-cycle gas turbine power stations which use diesel to generate electricity. The diesel reserves have been depleted at the Gourikwa and Ankerlig gas turbines leading to the shutdown of the power stations.The Drakensberg and Palmiet pumped storage schemes, which use water to generate electricity, have reduced output as a result of depleted water reserves. A further 1 000MW of capacity is offline after three coal-powered units tripped on Thursday because of technical faults. Certain power stations are also in dire need of maintenance and are not functioning optimally. The country is now increasingly dependent on the limited amount of electricity being bought from Mozambique and Namibia.

 

 

Even if demand falls over the weekend, Eskom says there are no guarantees of a load shedding-free festive season and electricity supply would remain unstable until at least 2019 when the Medupi, Kusile and Ingula power plants go online. “Stage 3 is bad, definitely. We are 4 500MW short of electricity which is a lot. It’s a big problem. It’s seriously big,” said Khulu Phasiwe, a spokesman for Eskom, adding that the Medupi, Kusile and Ingula plants, even when online, would barely cover the shortfall. He said diesel supply was beyond the control of the organization. “We are low on diesel that our generators need. Diesel is not an Eskom domain. We buy from our supplier, Petro SA and Chevron, and they, in turn, are waiting for their suppliers.” He said generators were unable to supply power optimally. “The reason we load shed is because there is more demand than the capacity to supply. We are load shedding to prevent a collapse of the system, the power-generating grid. “Right now we are in control because with rotational load shedding we can determine which areas, and at what times there is no power. But if the system collapses there will be uncontrolled, rolling blackouts where power will go randomly and we will not be able to stop it. 

NOW- TO READ THE WHOLE STORY ….

“Load shedding is not a good thing but it is necessary at this stage. We don’t even talk about what comes after this. This is as serious as it gets. After this there is no control.”- Khulu Pasiwe ( spokesperson for ESKOM)

 

THEN….

 

“There is no crisis at Eskom. I think the way Eskom gets reported on creates the perception of a crisis..” -Tshediso Matona : CEO ESKOM

-THEN AGAIN…

 ” Load shedding is here to stay..”- Tsediso Matona: CEO ESKOM